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VIDEO SERIES

Plants used to dye textiles
 

ABOUT THE VIDEO SERIES

Series Summary

 

The Virtual Living Archaeology Weekend Video Series demonstrates ancient and historic technologies important to the people who have lived in Kentucky’s Appalachian region. The series is designed to broaden the reach of Living Archaeology Weekend (LAW), Kentucky’s longest running live archaeology education event and the cornerstone of Kentucky Archaeology Month. It has been held every September at the Gladie Center in the Daniel Boone National Forest’s Red River Gorge since 1989. LAW’s mission is to provide teachers, students, and the general public with diverse, high-quality, multi- sensory educational opportunities in American Indian and Pioneer technologies and other lifeways, archaeological interpretation, and archaeological site preservation.

William H. Holmes drawing of textile structure

The series consists of short videos (15 minutes, HD format) presenting the background, process, and importance of ancient and historic technologies as demonstrated by LAW scholars and experts. To enhance its use in educational contexts, each episode has distinct segments. Video pairs targeting the same technology offer opportunities for comparison and contrast. The series also features a companion website with informational links, demonstrator profiles, and educational materials designed for use in classrooms and other instructional contexts.

The Virtual Living Archaeology Video Series is a production of the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists (KyOPA), a 509a2 tax-exempt public charity and organization of archaeologists with an interest in historic preservation in Kentucky. KyOPA holds sole copyright. The video series is produced by Voyageur Media Group, Inc. (a 501c3 nonprofit organization) under the supervision of an advisory panel composed of LAW Steering Committee members.

Distribution

 

The Virtual Living Archaeology Weekend Video Series is accessible through the LAW website as free streaming videos for viewing and download for non-commercial research and educational purposes by viewers, teachers, and students across the Commonwealth of Kentucky and throughout the world. The videos also will be made available free for further distribution to several public nonprofit organizations, including: KET (Kentucky Educational Television) for broadcast and streaming; PBS LearningMedia, a media-on-demand service that offers educators access to public media and research- based, classroom-ready digital learning experiences that align with National and Common Core State Standards; The Archaeology Channel, an academic, nonprofit, web- streaming service; and at public screenings and education workshops.

Funding

Funding for the series comes from the Daniel Boone National Forest, the Kentucky office of the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Federal Highway Administration, the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, the US Forest Service - Southern Region, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Preservation Kentucky, the Bill Huser Memorial Fund, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Kentucky Humanities, and a host of other organizations and individuals who provide in-kind services.

LAW Video Series Factsheet
Photo of cordage and replicated textile slipper
 

EPISODE 1  AMERICAN INDIAN TEXTILES

Episode Summary

 

American Indian Textiles examines the inspiration, traditions, creativity, and diversity of ancient and traditional Native American textile technologies. Viewers learn how oral history and archaeology provide insights into indigenous textile technologies used for millennia in eastern Kentucky. The program features two Living Archaeology Weekend demonstrators. Christina Pappas, an archaeologist and textiles specialist, describes the natural resources and methods American Indians used to create woven slippers from the rattlesnake master plant. Choogie Kingfisher, a storyteller and Cherokee Nation National Treasure, describes how the textile traditions of his ancestors were passed down through the generations to the present day.

American Indian Textiles is the first episode in The Virtual Living Archaeology Weekend Video Series, a production of the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists. Presented in distinct segments to enhance its educational use, the video is available free for viewing and download on the Living Archaeology Weekend website. A companion video – Pioneer Textiles (Episode 2) – focuses on eastern Kentucky’s historic-era textiles, which are rooted in Western European textile traditions.

Educational Materials

 

American Indian Textiles features diverse educational materials developed for use by Kentucky educators to engage their upper elementary school (4-5th grades) social studies students, while strengthening their visual, art, literacy, and analytical thinking skills. These materials include a short, illustrated essay for students offering information about Native textile traditions, questions for teacher-led discussions, two research activity suggestions, a hands-on activity, and resources/resource links to support instructional use in a variety of contexts. The materials are aligned to Kentucky Academic Standards in Social Studies, Reading and Writing, and Visual and Performing Arts.

American Indian Textiles video fact sheet
 
Tools and yarns for making textiles

EPISODE 2  PIONEER TEXTILES

Episode Summary

Pioneer Textiles describes the tools, techniques, and historic-era traditions of processing flax and wool into yarn and fabric in eastern Kentucky. Viewers learn how archaeological and archival sources document textile use and production, providing insights into the region’s roots in Western European textile traditions. Living Archaeology Weekend demonstrator JoAnn Oborski, a spinner and weaver, describes the methods and materials Kentucky’s pioneers and their descendants used to turn flax and wool into textiles using spinning wheels and looms. Historic archaeologist Wayna Roach explains how archaeological and archival sources document textile use and production, providing insights into eastern Kentucky’s textile traditions.

Pioneer Textiles is the second episode in The Virtual Living Archaeology Weekend Video Series, a production of the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists. Presented in distinct segments to enhance its educational use, the video is available free for viewing and download on the Living Archaeology Weekend website. A companion video – American Indian Textiles (Episode 1) – examines the inspiration, traditions, creativity, and diversity of ancient and traditional Native American textile technologies.

Educational Materials

 

Pioneer Textiles features educational materials developed for use by Kentucky educators to engage their upper elementary school (4-5th grades) social studies students, while strengthening their visual, art, literacy, and analytical thinking skills. These materials include a short, illustrated essay for students offering information about Pioneer textile and clothing traditions, questions for teacher-led discussions, a research activity suggestion, a hands-on activity, and resources/resource links to support instructional use in a variety of contexts. The materials are aligned to Kentucky Academic Standards in Social Studies, Reading and Writing, and Visual and Performing Arts.

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