LAW News​: What's Happening

Olivia Ruth Short Wins 2013 Student Essay Contest

29 November 2013

​The LAW student essay contest reinforces the cultural resource preservation goal of the event. In 2013 students from participating schools wrote short essays in response to the question “Why is preserving cultural resources in the Red River Gorge important?” We are pleased to announce that Olivia Ruth Short, a fifth-grade student of Wellspring Homeschool Community in Waco, Kentucky, received the award for Best Essay. Olivia, pictured here with Steering Committee members Eric Schlarb and Gwynn Henderson, received a certificate in recognition of her accomplishment and other prizes. She also won a pizza party for her class and a complete set of Kentucky Archaeology Video Series DVDs for her teacher. Congratulations, Olivia! Click here to read Olivia's winning essay and learn more about the LAW student essay contest.

Olivia Ruth Short is the 2013 LAW Student Essay Contest winner!

Gladie Cabin Gets a New Roof . . . And an Award!

7 May 2013, Updated 29 November 2013

 

Gladie Cabin at the Gladie Historic Site serves as the focal point of the pioneer technologies demonstration area at Living Archaeology Weekend. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989 for its role in the settlement and industrial development of Red River Gorge in 1875-1924. The log structure historically served as a single family dwelling, a hotel, and a post office. Frenchburg Job Corps worked with HistoriCorps, a non-profit organization specializing in historic structures repair, and the US Forest Service to replace the roof. Click here to learn more about the Gladie Cabin and the National Register of Historic Places. Click here to read more about the Gladie Cabin roofing project and see pictures of the work.

 

In November the Gladie Cabin Roof Project completed last May got a special “Behind the Shield” award in Atlanta at the 2013 USFS Southeast Regional Awards ceremony.  The Regional Forester, Liz Agpoa, gave this award herself in a new category that highlights the stories of people behind the Forest Service shield or badge. Pictured at right, Frank Beum, the Daniel Boone Forest Supervisor, conveyed the award to project coordinator Wayna Adams, member of the LAW Steering Committee and Daniel Boone National Forest Heritage Program Manager. Beum said Agpoa was impressed by the sheer number of people involved in the project, and seemed especially touched by the involvement of Dick Wengert, who initiated retiree partici-pation in the project and remained dedicated to it even as he battled terminal cancer. 

 

The roof is looking great and has inspired the staff at the Gladie Center to prepare a new program for the cabin. Center staff plan to develop interpretive material for the public and to eventually have costumed interpreters periodically stationed at the cabin, talking about the Ledford family and working in a vegetable garden.  It seems the new roof has given the cabin a whole new life! So, be sure to visit the Gladie Cabin at LAW or anytime year-round!

Gladie Cabin sporting a new shake roof

Kentucky archaeology, pioneer technology
Kentucky archaeology, pioneer technology

Wayna Adams accepts the Behind the Badge award from Frank Beum

Student using a grinding stone at plant domestication demonstration

primitive technology, Kentucky archaeology
primitive technology, Kentucky archaeology
LAW Educational Research Project: The Results Are In

22 January 2013

 

In 2011 the LAW Steering Committee initiated a collaborative project to evaluate and assess student learning that takes place at LAW, something that had never been done before. The educational research project was completed in 2012 and the researchers are sharing the fascinating results. Co-authors Dr. Linda Levstik (University of Kentucky), Dr. Gwynn Henderson (LAW Steering Committee), and Mr. Youngdo Lee (Glendover Elementary School) submitted a paper entitled "Teaching the Past in Place: Material Culture as Evidence of Human Ingenuity" for publication in the journal Social Studies and the Young Learner. It is the first of what they hope will be several articles discussing the educational effectiveness of Living Archaeology Weekend and follow-up in-class activities. Follow this link to read more about the LAW educational research project.

Andrew Rodriguez Wins 2012 Student Essay Contest

30 November 2012

​The LAW student essay contest reinforces the cultural resource preservation goal of the event. In 2012 students from participating schools wrote short essays in response to the question “Why is preserving cultural resources in the Red River Gorge important?” We are pleased to announce that Andrew Rodriguez, a fifth-grade student at Glendover Elementary School in Lexington, received the award for Best Essay. Andrew, pictured here with Steering Committee members Wayna Adams and Eric Schlarb, received a certificate in recognition of his accomplishment. He also won a pizza party for his class and a complete set of Kentucky Archaeology Video Series DVDs for his teacher, Mr. Youngdo Lee. Congratulations, Andrew! Click here to learn more about the LAW student essay contest.

2012 LAW student essay contest winner

primitive technology, Kentucky archaeology
primitive technology, Kentucky archaeology

2012 LAW teacher workshop

teacher workshop, Kentucky archaeology
teacher workshop, Kentucky archaeology
Second Annual Teacher Workshop a Success

9 July 2012

 

The LAW Steering Committee organized the second annual Teacher Workshop at Natural Bridge State Park in Slade. Teachers from Wolfe, Menifee, Scott, Fayette, and Henry counties participated. In collaboration with Steering Committee members, the teachers completed an activity called "Why the Past is Important" and a lesson plan on "Chronology: The Time of My Life." Teachers who attended LAW previously, like Youngdo Lee pictured here, provided valuable feedback for improving the event, and we reviewed the LAW Teacher Resource Packet with teachers new to LAW. The teachers especially enjoyed hands-on activities in which their students will participate: using pump drills, throwing spears, making cordage, and making corn husk dolls. Follow this link to learn more about the LAW teacher workshop.

Hannah Brooks Wins Inaugural Student Essay Contest

​13 December 2011

​The LAW Steering Committee initiated a student essay contest in 2011 in order to reinforce the cultural resource preservation goal of the LAW event. Students from participating schools wrote short essays about “Why preserving cultural resources in the Red River Gorge is important.” We are pleased to announce that Hannah Brooks, a fifth-grade student at Menifee Elementary School in Frenchburg, received the award for Best Essay. Hannah, pictured here with Steering Committee members Gwynn Henderson and Wayna Adams, received a certificate in recognition of her accomplishment. She won a pizza party for her class and a complete set of Kentucky Archaeology Video Series DVDs for her social studies teacher, Mrs. Tonya Sain. Congratulations, Hannah! Click here to learn more about the LAW student essay contest.

LAW student essay contest winner 2011

Kentucky archaeology
Kentucky archaeology

hospice quilt hospice quilt
LAW Visitors Make Hospice Quilt
23 September 2011

Students participating in Living Archaeology Weekend 2011 helped create this beautiful quilt for Community Hospice in Ashland, Kentucky. Using a method called “tacking,” the students tied each individual stitch to hold the quilt layers together. Quilt demonstrator Evelyn Morgan, an employee at the Daniel Boone National Forest Superintendent's Office,  completed the quilt with binding. At Community Hospice, local quilters like Evelyn provide quilts to each patient who comes into the facility. Quilting was a technology essential to the survival of early pioneers and continues today as a form of art. Students at LAW not only learned about this craft, but they contributed to an important public service project.

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